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Tag Archives: intelligence augmentation

From maker space to solver space

Conferences are for meetings.  Project teams build deliverables.  Data is for data scientists.  Online communities are for social contact.

Until now, when a new mix is emerging.  Can we solve difficult problems in a short-term conference setting?  Is there a new way to run a workshop, which is dynamic, data-driven, visual, collaborative?

I wrote a few months back about the Silicon Valley Sim Center: an initiative to bring a new way to solve “wicked” problems to Silicon valley.  And in an article in this month’s Wired called “Hey Silicon Valley, Buckminster Fuller has a lot to teach you by Sarah Fallon, she interviews Jonathon Keats about his new book on what Bucky has to say to Silicon Valley.*

And from “maker spaces” to “solver spaces”, a new way of working together to solve difficult problems is emerging.

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The World Resources Sim Center: on its way to Silicon Valley

Last month I received an intriguing email inviting me to an event at Kimberly Wiefling’s house.  I’d met Kimberly before through Jonathan Trent, as part of the work I’ve been doing to help out the Omega Global Initiative.  I knew she was an international consultant, but it was great to also learn that she was passionate about systems thinking and visualization.  Jonathan and I drove up to Kimberly’s house together, where she and  Peter Meisen explained their initiative to bring a Buckminster Fuller-inspired Sim Center, based on a similar center in San Diego, to Silicon Valley.

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Guest Post: The dirty dozen: twelve ways to fail at effective decision making

In the course of my decision analysis, analytics, and intelligence work for businesses and industry, I have identified a set of common points of failure in a typical decision engineering initiative.  These characterize the “hidden traps”, where decision makers often struggle to preserve the integrity of the Decision Engineering life cycle.

Below is the chain of those failure points. I have listed them in a sequence in which I have found them to typically occur.  Each one encompass the preceding two points in the list.

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Decision: I do not think it means what you think it means

We use the word “decision” to mean two very different things.  If I say “I’ve decided that the moon is made of green cheese”, or “I’ve decided that the economy will deteriorate next year”, these statements aren’t necessarily about actions I’m going to take.  If, instead, I say, “I’ve decided to go to go to graduate school” or “I’ve decided to institute a new policy”, that’s fundamentally different.

How?  The first kind of decision leads to a fact, either well-supported or not.  It is, essentially, using data and expertise, following its implications (deductively, inductively, or otherwise), and leading to a conclusion (which may have more or less justification: to fit this category it doesn’t have to be right). Continue reading

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